Follow Through Featured in Combat Tactics Magazine

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Follow Through Featured in Combat Tactics Magazine

Follow Through's Scoped Carbine course is featured in the current issue of Combat Tactics Magazine.

Follow Through's Scoped Carbine course is featured in the current issue of Combat Tactics Magazine.

Follow Through's Scoped Carbine Course Featured in Combat Tactics Magazine

(To read a .PDF of the full article from the magazine click the link below)

"The Unsung Leatherneck" Combat Tactics Magazine, Fall 2014

Recently, I was fortunate to have the guys from Surefire Lights, LLC come out to take one of my Scoped Carbine courses in Teasdale, UT.  Surefire's Thomas Carlson was kind enough to document his experience in his article "The Unsung Leatherneck"--a full 9-page color spread--in the newest issue of Surefire's Combat Tactics Magazine.  With tons of great photos and a detailed description of the course, I think it does an excellent job of capturing the elements of the Scoped Rifle course that make it truly unique.  Thanks to Thomas and Surefire--I'm looking forward to having you out to another Follow Through course soon!

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After Action Report: 3-day Scoped Rifle in Teasdale, UT (Photos)

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After Action Report: 3-day Scoped Rifle in Teasdale, UT (Photos)

This past weekend we held our first 3-day Scoped Rifle course at the scenic and rustic Red River Ranch facility in Teasdale, UT.  We have been working hard over the past year to create a training venue that provides not only unmatched views, but challenging courses of fire that utilize the area's micro terrain and provide shooters of all levels a chance to identify and maximize the capabilities of their individual weapons.

This course is perfect for anyone who plans to step off the square bay with their AR--from the first morning we were shooting on the move and applying the fundamentals of marksmanship under conditions that elevated the heart rate and required constant and conscious adjustment of our body position and weapons.

This being our first run of the course, we invited some of our industry partners from Surefire, LLC and Armalite to shoot alongside a couple of seasoned, world-traveled hunters.  While all were experienced shooters, none had run a course quite like the one at the Teasdale facility.  Shooters worked on maximizing the use of cover and barricades, identifying and establishing points of domination, engaging targets from 5 to 500 meters (in a single course of fire), as well as training in low-light conditions.

The positive feedback we've received has us even more excited about our Fall and Winter Red River Ranch courses.  Be sure and reserve your spot in our next Scoped Rifle course on Sept. 26-28th. (Additional dates TBA soon!)

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In the News/ On the Web: Video from Tactical Life author and industry freelance writer, David Bahde

In the midst of our first summer of offering firearms courses to the public, I felt very fortunate to have David Bahde--former law enforcement, freelance writer for national industry mags (Special Weapons, Tactical Life, etc), and a really knowledgable guy--come to my recent Carbine I: Practical Applications course here in Logan, UT.  Here's some video he posted from the course; he will be writing a full review on his site later in the week: http://www.firearmsandtactics.com

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Amazing Range: Prepping for the Scoped Rifle course in Teasdale, UT..

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Amazing Range: Prepping for the Scoped Rifle course in Teasdale, UT..

At 6700 ft. elevation, just outside of Capitol Reef National Park, I'm shooting from between the rails of an old ranch fence, across the Fremont River, and hearing the clang of the reactive steel targets embedded in dusty red rock cliffs on the other side.  Yep, I'm pretty much in heaven...(though if my wife asks, I'm working!).   Really though, I've been finishing up work at the Teasdale, UT range facility, looking forward to the 3-day Scoped Rifle course Aug. 15-17th.  I have to say, that if I could turn back the clock to my days as a Recon Team Leader--this is exactly where I'd bring my guys to train.  Instead of a square bay or a table we'll shoot from an old log or from the cover of a ditch.  With three full days and an unlimited number of courses of fire (at  mid-range distances mostly 100-800m), we will use the natural terrain for varying shooting positions, moving/bounding to cover, and adjust to the unpredictable winds that are common out here in "God's Country".  Here's a few pics of me moving targets and working on the range.  We've still got a few spots open for this course--click here for more information.

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Basic ≠ Beginner; getting away from the myth of "Advanced" shooting

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Basic ≠ Beginner; getting away from the myth of "Advanced" shooting

Practical application of the fundamentals--Buck Doyle, Afghanistan, Aug. 2009.

I've had a lot of guys ask me when I'm going to put some "Advanced" courses on the schedule, and my reply to them is, "what is 'Advanced'?".  Most aren't really sure--maybe they've been shooting a while, have some military or law enforcement experience, or do a lot of hunting.  They know they're not a Beginner, and have mistakenly equated course titles like "Carbine Basics" with "Carbine Beginner".  Let me explain why I don't use the term "Advanced", and why in my opinion, mastery of the "Basics" (fundamentals of marksmanship) separates the very best shooters from all the rest.

There's been a lot written over the years in industry mags and books about the importance of "mastering the basics".   But for every one of those articles you'll find 50 YouTube videos of guys doing backflips with their AR, shooting upside down, from the trunk of their car, or some other "advanced" technique.  Most males I come across are naturally drawn to courses labeled "Combat", "Tactical", or "Sniper"--even though they are marketed to civilians, who may not have been in combat with anything more deadly than the flu.  The fact is, we like to feel like we have skills that are "advanced" or "high speed."

What if I told you that the most "advanced" shooters I know are the ones who have mastered the fundamentals? Through thousands of correct repetitions, they have developed the "muscle memory" to ensure their fundamental skills remain intact when they are practically applied (real life).  I consider the fundamentals of marksmanship to include: grip, stance, sight alignment, sight picture, trigger control, breathing, and follow through.  Each of those "basics" can be broken down further and generalized to any practical environment or situation.  

In a military environment, I've watched a highly trained shooter--who'd been to all the "advanced" schools the military had to offer--as he would take off gear to establish a good shooting position, slow his breathing under high stress, consciously adjust his grip on the rifle, and successfully take a difficult shot at long distance.  Sure, this guy was "high speed"--but only because he had continually trained and mastered the fundamentals of marksmanship.

Practical application of the fundamentals should be the goal of every shooter.  For the border patrol agent, practical application could mean establishing a solid shooting platform from a helicopter.  For the lone Highway Patrolman it might be shooting from his vehicle and moving quickly and efficiently to cover.  For my wife it might mean safely employing concealed carry techniques in a dark parking lot.  They each rely on a solid grasp of the "basics" when they are employed in a practical environment.

While my Basic courses (1-day) are appropriate for most beginners, they will also improve the consistency and technique of an experienced shooter.  Carbine or Pistol I & II courses (2 & 3-days) allow more time for practical application, but are still founded in the fundamentals of marksmanship.  Every professional marksmanship instructor or competitive shooter has their "niche" or focus.  Based on my experience in the military and as a civilian contractor in support of combat operations, my focus has been combining the fundamentals with movement, points of domination, dealing with physical and psychological stress (elevated heart rate), and self diagnostics (Buckism #39: 'Do you know what you just did?').  I address all of these things in each one of my courses.

**Keep checking the website and Facebook page--we will be adding Carbine I (2-day) to the schedule for August!  

 

 

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After Action Report: Cache Valley 1-Day Basic Carbine Course

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After Action Report: Cache Valley 1-Day Basic Carbine Course

Saturday was a great day to shoot and train in the scenic Cache Valley, where we held a 1-Day Basic Carbine course at the Cache Valley Public Shooting Range.  Students included both civilians and law enforcement, with some of "Utah's finest" coming in to train from units across the state.

Focusing on the fundamentals of marksmanship (grip stance, sight alignment/sight picture, trigger control, breathing, and follow through), training emphasized conscious position and weapon manipulation, avoiding a "going through the motions" mentality that can hamper safety and accuracy for even the most seasoned shooter.  

Anyone who thought they were going to be spending all day standing still on a square bay soon realized that's not what we do here at Follow Through.  As a firm believer in training for a practical environment, we had shooters on the move before lunch--defining points of domination, refining individual shooting positions, and incorporating movement and an elevated heart rate to assess its impact on shooter performance.  

We had a great group of guys, ready to learn and put in a full day's training.  As a result, we were able to get a lot in for a 1-day course while maintaining a safe training environment and a high level of individual instruction.

Basic Carbine is a course that will benefit any level of shooter, whether they're a new carbine owner without formal training, or an experienced military or LE rifleman--because there's no shooter that's above revisiting the fundamentals. 

 

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Welcome to "Buckisms"

I've had a lot of different titles--been called my fair share of names, but "blogger" was never one of them.  Being the crusty old Marine I am, I assumed that title was reserved for tech geeks who like to see their ideas in electronic print or friends of my wife whose obsession with recipes, organic diaper changing, and shopping needed an outlet. 

I'll be the first guy to tell you that staying current--whether it be on the battlefield or the ball field--is the key to staying relevant and being the best at what you do.  My wife often reminds me that behind my thick skull is a guy with lots of ideas and experience to share.  So, in the spirit of staying current, I've decided to start a blog and share some of that knowledge, as well as my take on some of the current trends in the firearms/defense/training industry.   

I hope you'll find the blog posts to be informative, interesting, or at the very least mildly entertaining--Feel free to email me with feedback or ideas and topics you'd like to hear more about.  Welcome to Buckisms! 

 

 

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